Emerging Op-Eds: Networking in a New City

Emerging Op-Eds is a community series that shares opinions and tips from our NEMPN members. Have an idea or a topic you’d like to share? Submit your idea here.


Networking in a New City
by Cassandra Cavness

Being an emerging professional often means moving for your first “real” job. Moving can be nerve-wracking and there are many factors to consider, including how to get connected to those in your field. Museum work, much like other fields, relies heavily on networking. Being able to establish yourself in your new city is crucial for becoming an integral part of the field.

Why is networking important?

Maya Angelou once said, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Networking is all about how you make people feel. Do they feel comfortable with your personality? Do they feel comfortable with your skill set and knowledge? Do they feel that they can trust your integrity and follow through? These questions often cannot be answered in one meeting but will be answered through a process of relationship building. Networking is important because it shows your ability to handle yourself and adapt to new and unfamiliar situations as you build relationships that could prove fruitful down the line.

Where to network?

Networking in your new city can seem like a daunting task, however, that’s where this blog comes in handy. Below are some great suggestions to get you started in any new city that you move to.

  • Facebook: This is a great place to start because there are plenty of Facebook groups geared toward emerging professionals.
    • NEMPN: We’re a ready-made network of people to talk to about museum related issues and theories.
    • Think local: There are often local emerging professional groups on Facebook that you can join so that you can network with professionals within your state or nearby city. These groups are great for finding out about local events and getting advice on how to handle museum issues within local parameters.
  • Networking Events: There are often local networking events that are not specifically geared toward museum professionals, but they are great opportunities. Use these events to understand how your profession fits into the fabric of the community.
  • Local Affiliation Groups: Although your town might not have local events that are directly related to your field, they will often have events geared toward similar interests. For example, if you work in an art museum, look for arts-related events in the community. These events might be hosted by your local college or non-profits, but regardless, it is a good idea to get to know those in your community that have interests similar to the mission of your museum.  
  • Local Boards: If you have more than one museum or a local art/history guild, you might have local boards that you can join. Try to become familiar with the type of educational opportunities there are for children in your city, because often times those non-profits will have boards that you can join.
  • Alumni Groups: Not every college will have nationwide alumni groups, but for those that do, take advantage of the opportunities that your local chapter gives you.

How to network:

Okay, so now you have moved, you’re all settled in and you’ve begun to find some different networking avenues. But now you’re thinking, “How do I actually network?” Although people tend to think of networking in terms of what it will get them, this isn’t the right approach. Below are 6 simple steps to networking that will get you your desired results in the long run but will also foster relationships in the immediate.

  1. Start to Network Immediately: I cannot stress this enough, do not wait until you have a need to know people in your community. This will make your effort to connect less genuine. Instead, start connecting the minute your foot touches down in your new city.
  2. Forget Your Personal Reasons: Don’t think of networking as a means to further your personal goals. People can tell when others are only there to better themselves and it is off-putting to say the least. Make this a mutual or reciprocal relationship by thinking of what you can do for others.
  3. Have a Plan/Know What You Can Offer: Treat networking like an advertisement of your skills. Don’t boast and brag but go in with the confidence of knowing what you bring to the table. During an event, try to talk to as many people as possible and get a feel for their needs. See how your skills can be an asset and offer to help.
  4. Be Friendly and Open: One of the most important parts of a networking opportunity is interacting with people. Be friendly and open to others’ ideas and suggestions, but also be open by contributing to the conversation with your knowledge and/or advice. Don’t underestimate your worth to a conversation.
  5. Think Collaboratively: Just like you don’t want to underestimate yourself in a conversation, don’t underestimate those around you. Although these people might not have the same educational background as you, that doesn’t mean that their ideas or suggestions don’t have merit. Look for ways that you could integrate what they are saying to fit your needs (whether they are personal, institutional, or academic) and how they could help you in a team-oriented way.
  6. Collect Contact Information: The most important part of networking is collecting the contact information from the people that you meet. What good does it do you to have a great conversation with someone and walk away not remembering who they were or not knowing how to contact them? Also, it is just as important for you to be able to give out your contact information as well.
    • Don’t forget to follow up and follow through! If you say you’re going to follow up with someone with an email or phonecall, do it promptly so that you are still in their mind and to reaffirm that new connection.

 

Remember…

Although these are just a few tips and tricks to networking in a new city, there are a variety of ways to engage in this important task. It is also good to remember that networking can happen anywhere at anytime if you are willing to be friendly and introduce yourself wherever you are. Take every opportunity to create relationships, because you might not get another chance.  Always keep business cards on you to hand out to people because you never know they will come in handy – a new and important relationship could be just around the corner!


nempn cavnessCassandra Cavness serves as Assistant Professor and Humanities Digital Archivist for Alabama State University and currently serves as the co-chair of the Alabama chapter of the National Emerging Professional Network. Her primary research focus is the interpretation of history through a visual lens and she has 4 years of practical experience in the fields of museum studies, public history, and cultural outreach. Previously, she has served as the manager of the Syracuse University Sue & Leon Genet Gallery and an archive and museum consultant for various nonprofit organizations.
Contact Cassandra by email: cassandra.cavness@gmail.com.
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